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Research Guides

Community & Global Health

Start Your Research

Welcome! This guide will get you started with library-based research in Community & Global Health.

To search for books or articles use Library Search on the library website.

The Claremont Colleges Library use the Library of Congress Classification System to organize physical books in the library. Our science section can be found on the first (1st) floor of the Honnold side of the building. Below, you will find a list of subjects and the call number grouping in which they may be found. 

LC Subclasses for Community & Global Health

  • Education (General): call numbers beginning with L
  • Education, theory and practice: call numbers beginning with LA
  • History: call numbers beginning with D
  • Social Sciences: call numbers beginning with H
  • Medicine: call numbers beginning with R
  • Public Health: call numbers beginning with RA
  • Pharmacy: call numbers beginning with RS
  • Natural History (Biology): call numbers beginning with QH
  • Human Anatomy: call numbers beginning with QM
  • Physiology: call numbers beginning with QP
  • Microbiology: call numbers beginning with QR

Evaluating Your Sources

The following information will guide you in determining if a source (journal, article, book, website, etc.) credible and reliable, and thereby, appropriate for your research paper.


USING THE CRAAP TEST

Australia, University of South. “Study Help: Evaluating Information.” YouTube, YouTube, 22 Oct. 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=2U3dkTLjuvE.​


​CRAAP is an acronym for Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. Use the CRAAP Test to evaluate your sources.

CURRENCY: The timeliness of the information

  • When was the information published or posted?
  • Has the information been revised or updated?
  • Does your topic require current information, or can older information work?
  • Are the links functional on the site?

RELEVANCE: The importance of the information for your needs

  • Does the information meet your needs?
  • Who is the intended audience?  
  • Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced)?

AUTHORITY: The source of the information

  • Who is the author / publisher / source / sponsor? Knowing who or what funds the source will tell you more about any existing bias. 
  • What are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations? Are they a scholar or a celebrity figure?
  • Is the author qualified to write the topic? Do they have a degree or expertise in the area in which they are writing?
  • What does the URL revel about the author or source? (i.e. .com, .edu, .gov, .org, .net)
    • Domains ending in .edu or .gov are considered the most reliable. However, be aware that any domain may contain items with bias.
    • PLEASE NOTE: It is OK to use sources with bias present as long as you address it and make your reader aware of it in your research. 

ACCURACY: The reliability, truthfulness and correctness of the content

  • What does the information come from?
  • Is the information supported by evidence? Are there citations or references?
  • Has the information been reviewed?
  • Are there spelling, grammar or typographical errors?

PURPOSE: The reason the information exists. 

  • Is it to inform, teach, sell, entertain or persuade?
  • Do the authors / sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear?
  • Is the information fact, opinion or propaganda?
  • Are there any political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional or personal biases? 

*Adapted from "Evaluating Information - Applying the CRAAP Test" by Meriam Library, CSU


EVALUATION MATERIALS

  • Facticious
    Digitally interactive quiz created in 2017 by veteran journalist, Maggie Farley. Factitious provides content that can be evaluated then swiped as correct or incorrect. Users are notified in real-time whether they evaluated correctly. Content provided for the evaluation process includes, cited sources that can be checked, publication names, direct quotes, images and more. This is a great resource for testing your skills in identifying credible and reliable content. 

FACT CHECKING WEBSITES

Use these sites to fact-check information that you find online.


HOW TO SPOT A MISLEADING GRAPH

TED-Ed. “How to Spot a Misleading Graph - Lea Gaslowitz.” YouTube, YouTube, 6 July 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=E91bGT9BjYk.

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STEM Librarian

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Kimberly Jackson
Contact:
Claremont Colleges Library
(909) 607-7168