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Claremont Discourse: Constitution Day

"Elections and the Constitution" is a discussion of Congress's constitutional powers to regulate federal elections to ensure their legitimacy, with an eye toward regulation of disputed or disrupted elections.

Zachary Courser is a visiting assistant professor of government at Claremont McKenna College (CMC) and Co-Director of CMC's Policy Lab. He is currently part of a collaborative research team of French and American scholars studying the rise of populism in the US and Europe.

References

Bradley, J. P. & Supreme Court Of The United States. (1879) U.S. Reports: Ex parte Siebold, 100 U.S. 371. [Periodical] Retrieved from the Library of Congress

Garrett, R. S. (2020). Disrupted Federal Elections: Policy Issues for Congress (No. IF11456). Congressional Research Service.

Miller, S. F. & Supreme Court Of The United States. (1883) U.S. Reports: Ex parte Yarbrough, 110 U.S. 651. [Periodical] Retrieved from the Library of Congress

Morris, R. (2003). Fraud of the century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and the stolen election of 1876. Simon & Schuster.

Scott Bomboy. (2020, April 10). Does the Constitution allow for a delayed presidential election? Constitution Daily: Smart Conversation from the National Constitution Center

Sutherland, G. & Supreme Court Of The United States. (1933) U.S. Reports: Burroughs and Cannon v. U.S., 290 U.S. 534. [Periodical] Retrieved from the Library of Congress